dobooks:

Networks (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art)

 

The dawn of the electronic media age in the 1960s began a cultural shift from the modernist grid and its determination of projection and representation to the fluid structures and circuits of the network, presenting art with new challenges and possibilities. This anthology considers art at the center of network theory, from the 1960s to the present.

Artists have used the “space of flows” as a basis for creating utopian scenarios, absurd yet functional propositions or holistic planetary visions. Others have explored the economies of reciprocity and the ethics of generosity, in works that address changed conditions of codependence and new sites of social negotiation. The “infra-power” of the network has been a departure point for self-organized counterculture and the creation of new types of agency. And a “poetics of connectivity” runs through a diverse range of work that addresses the social and material complexity of networks through physical structures and ambient installation, the mapping of the Internet, or the development of robots and software that take on the functions of artist or curator.

Artists surveyed includeJoseph Beuys, Ursula Biemann, Heath Bunting, Critical Art Ensemble, Fernand Deligny, Peter Fend, Gego, Jobim Jochimsen, Koncern, Christine Kozlov, Pia Lindman, Mark Lombardi, Diana McCarty, Marta Minujín, Aleksandra Mir, Tanja Ostojic, Ola Pehrson, Walid Raad, Artüras Raila, Hito Steyerl, Tomaso Tozzi, Suzanne Treister, Ultra Red, Wolf Vostell, Stephen Willats

**Writers include **Jane Bennett, Hakim Bey, Luc Boltanski, Manuel Castells, Ève Chiapello, Guy Debord, Umberto Eco, Okwui Enwezor, Michael Hardt, Bruno Latour, Marshall McLuhan, Marcel Mauss, Reza Negarestani, Antonio Negri, Sadie Plant, Lane Relyea, Craig Saper, Saskia Sassen, Pit Schultz, Steven Shaviro, Tiziana Terranova, Paolo Virno

dobooks:

Networks (Whitechapel: Documents of Contemporary Art)

The dawn of the electronic media age in the 1960s began a cultural shift from the modernist grid and its determination of projection and representation to the fluid structures and circuits of the network, presenting art with new challenges and possibilities. This anthology considers art at the center of network theory, from the 1960s to the present.

Artists have used the “space of flows” as a basis for creating utopian scenarios, absurd yet functional propositions or holistic planetary visions. Others have explored the economies of reciprocity and the ethics of generosity, in works that address changed conditions of codependence and new sites of social negotiation. The “infra-power” of the network has been a departure point for self-organized counterculture and the creation of new types of agency. And a “poetics of connectivity” runs through a diverse range of work that addresses the social and material complexity of networks through physical structures and ambient installation, the mapping of the Internet, or the development of robots and software that take on the functions of artist or curator.

Artists surveyed includeJoseph Beuys, Ursula Biemann, Heath Bunting, Critical Art Ensemble, Fernand Deligny, Peter Fend, Gego, Jobim Jochimsen, Koncern, Christine Kozlov, Pia Lindman, Mark Lombardi, Diana McCarty, Marta Minujín, Aleksandra Mir, Tanja Ostojic, Ola Pehrson, Walid Raad, Artüras Raila, Hito Steyerl, Tomaso Tozzi, Suzanne Treister, Ultra Red, Wolf Vostell, Stephen Willats

**Writers include **Jane Bennett, Hakim Bey, Luc Boltanski, Manuel Castells, Ève Chiapello, Guy Debord, Umberto Eco, Okwui Enwezor, Michael Hardt, Bruno Latour, Marshall McLuhan, Marcel Mauss, Reza Negarestani, Antonio Negri, Sadie Plant, Lane Relyea, Craig Saper, Saskia Sassen, Pit Schultz, Steven Shaviro, Tiziana Terranova, Paolo Virno

"Those who predict the future tend to overestimate change in the short term and underestimate change in the long term. The Desk Set from 1957 with Katherine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy envisioned mainframe-based automation eliminating human staffers in a TV network research department. That has happened to some extent, though it took another 50 years and people are still involved. But the greater technological threat wasn’t to the research department but to the TV network itself. Will there even be television networks in 2029? Will there even be television?"

Big Data is the new Artificial Intelligence (via azspot)

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Dapper Jobs - Company Culture Job Postings and Job Board

DapperJobs is the first job board that prioritizes cultural fit.

Airbnb For Freelancers Helps People Find Creative Collaborators - PSFK

(Source: emergentfutures)

Contemporaneity and New Media - 24th April at Strathclyde University

This workshop will explore a range of responses to new media in contemporary artistic and cultural practice, considering how technological advances have been reflected, used, and resisted within art, literature and media.

Discussions will be led by:
Dr Timothy Barker (Lecturer in Digital Media, Unversity of Glasgow)
Dr Paul Crosthwaite (Lecturer in English Literature, University of Edinburgh)
Dr Petya Eckler (Lecturer in Journalism, University of Strathclyde)
Dr Lisa Otty (Lecturer in English Literature and Digital Humanities, University of Edinburgh)

Please see the attached PDF for full details.

This workshop is open to scholars working in any area of the arts, humanities, information sciences or social sciences. No prior expertise in the subjects discussed is expected or required. Preparatory reading may be circulated ahead of the event in order to better facilitate informal discussions.

Lunch, tea/coffee and wine will be served. For catering purposes, please register attendance and specify any dietary requirements using this link: www.formsofinnovation.com/register

Attendance is free and all are welcome. Please circulate this invitation to any researchers in your networks who may be interested.


*** Attachments:
http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1397578621_2014-04-15_humanist-owner@lists.digitalhumanities.org_27919.1.1.html

http://www.digitalhumanities.org/humanist/Attachments/1397578621_2014-04-15_humanist-owner@lists.digitalhumanities.org_27919.1.2.pdf

personalfactory:

" A large portion of the 3D printing community is within the open source world, while the rest is commercially oriented. Conflicts have occurred, but now there could be a way to reduce them. 
The Defensive Patent License is an initiative to develop an open source license that is intended to prevent patent trolling and encourage innovation. Here’s how it works, according to the organizers: 

Innovators who opt into the DPL network pledge to forgo any patent litigation against any other DPL user, except when asserting patents defensively. In return, they are eligible to receive royalty-free licenses from every other user’s portfolio. Anyone taking a license must promise to put all of her patents under the DPL. In the event that the patents are sold, DPL users must legally obligate the new owner to abide by prior DPLs. If one ceases offering one’s patents under the DPL, previous licensees keep their DPLs royalty-free, but the leaving user may have her licenses converted from royalty-free to fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms (FRAND) at the discretion of the remaining licensors.”

~ fabbaloo.com
www.defensivepatentlicense.com

personalfactory:

" A large portion of the 3D printing community is within the open source world, while the rest is commercially oriented. Conflicts have occurred, but now there could be a way to reduce them. 

The Defensive Patent License is an initiative to develop an open source license that is intended to prevent patent trolling and encourage innovation. Here’s how it works, according to the organizers: 

Innovators who opt into the DPL network pledge to forgo any patent litigation against any other DPL user, except when asserting patents defensively. In return, they are eligible to receive royalty-free licenses from every other user’s portfolio. Anyone taking a license must promise to put all of her patents under the DPL. In the event that the patents are sold, DPL users must legally obligate the new owner to abide by prior DPLs. If one ceases offering one’s patents under the DPL, previous licensees keep their DPLs royalty-free, but the leaving user may have her licenses converted from royalty-free to fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms (FRAND) at the discretion of the remaining licensors.”

~ fabbaloo.com

www.defensivepatentlicense.com

Readmill Epilogue - Readmill

Three years ago, we set out to create an open, independent reading platform. We believed that the reading experience could be beautiful and that it was meant to be shared. Along the way, we created a reading app for iOS and Android that proved these things to be true. We’re proud of the product we built, but even more so, we’re grateful for the community of readers that made it grow. At every turn, your feedback shaped Readmill’s development, and your passion signaled a new chapter for reading. Together we wrote in the margins of ebooks and discussed our favorite passages from across the world. Thank you for helping to bring this reality into view. Readmill’s story ends here. Many challenges in the world of ebooks remain unsolved, and we failed to create a sustainable platform for reading. For this, we’re deeply sorry. We considered every option before making the difficult decision to end the product that brought us together. As of today, it is no longer possible to create a new account, and on July 1, 2014, the Readmill app will no longer be available. For the next three months, our first priority is to help you transition to other services and get back to reading. All of your books and reading data are available for export in multiple formats. Our team will be joining Dropbox, where our expertise in reading, collaboration and syncing across devices finds a fitting home. Millions of people use Dropbox to store and share their digital lives, and we believe it’s a strong foundation on which to build the future of reading. We’re delighted to work alongside this talented team and imagine new ways to read together. Thank you for the time and attention you’ve contributed to this community. It has been a privilege to read together, and we look forward to meeting again, in new ways, in the margins. Sincerely, Henrik, David & the Readmill team

"Here is why this is so bad: the heartbeat response can contain up to sixty-four kilobytes of whatever data happens to be in the server’s random access memory at the moment the request arrives. There is no way to predict what that memory will contain, but system memory routinely contains login names, passwords, secure certificates, and access tokens of all kinds. System memory is temporary: it is erased when a computer is shut down, and the data it holds is written and overwritten all the time. It is generally regarded as safe to load things like cryptographic keys or unencrypted passwords into system memory—indeed, there is little a computer can usefully do without temporarily storing pieces of sensitive data in its system memory. The Heartbleed bug allows an attacker to “bleed” out random drops of this memory simply by asking for it. Heartbeat requests aren’t usually logged or monitored in any way, so an attack leaves no trace. It’s not even possible to distinguish malicious heartbeat requests from authentic requests without close analysis. So an attacker can request new pieces of system memory over and over again; it’s almost impossible for the victim to know they’ve been targeted, let alone to know what data might have been stolen."

The Internet’s Telltale Heartbleed (via azspot)

Heartbleed

Basically, an attacker can grab 64K of memory from a server. The attack leaves no trace, and can be done multiple times to grab a different random 64K of memory. This means that anything in memory — SSL private keys, user keys, anything — is vulnerable. And you have to assume that it is all compromised. All of it.

"Catastrophic" is the right word. On the scale of 1 to 10, this is an 11.

Half a million sites are vulnerable, including my own. Test your vulnerability here.

(Source: azspot)

"And so, finally, we end up with what to learn from Heartbleed. First, we need a new model of Critical Infrastructure protection, one that dedicates real financial resources to the safety and stability of the code our global economy depends on – without attempting to regulate that code to death. And second, we need to actually identify that code."

Dan Kaminsky on his blog. Be Still My Breaking Heart (via protoslacker)

fastcodesign:

Why The Security Bug Heartbleed Has A Catchy Logo

fastcodesign:

Why The Security Bug Heartbleed Has A Catchy Logo

(via themediafix)

overandoverandoverand:

c’mon Claude, no need to look so smug.
(Claude Shannon demonstrates Theseus, the maze-learning cybernetic mouse)

overandoverandoverand:

c’mon Claude, no need to look so smug.

(Claude Shannon demonstrates Theseus, the maze-learning cybernetic mouse)

(via notational)

gravemakers-and-gunslingers:


BOND is a tiny touch module. It can be a pendant or a bracelet but it comes in pairs. You keep one and you give one to a friend. When you touch it, your friend feels it. No matter where they are on the planet. We don’t do tweets, we do tickles.

we need this

gravemakers-and-gunslingers:

BOND is a tiny touch module. It can be a pendant or a bracelet but it comes in pairs. You keep one and you give one to a friend. When you touch it, your friend feels it. No matter where they are on the planet. We don’t do tweets, we do tickles.

we need this

(Source: ldrsociety)