overandoverandoverand:

c’mon Claude, no need to look so smug.
(Claude Shannon demonstrates Theseus, the maze-learning cybernetic mouse)

overandoverandoverand:

c’mon Claude, no need to look so smug.

(Claude Shannon demonstrates Theseus, the maze-learning cybernetic mouse)

(via notational)

gravemakers-and-gunslingers:


BOND is a tiny touch module. It can be a pendant or a bracelet but it comes in pairs. You keep one and you give one to a friend. When you touch it, your friend feels it. No matter where they are on the planet. We don’t do tweets, we do tickles.

we need this

gravemakers-and-gunslingers:

BOND is a tiny touch module. It can be a pendant or a bracelet but it comes in pairs. You keep one and you give one to a friend. When you touch it, your friend feels it. No matter where they are on the planet. We don’t do tweets, we do tickles.

we need this

(Source: ldrsociety)

txchnologist:

Take Your Medical Equipment On The Go

Engineers have taken another step forward in the quest for wearable, wireless biosensors. This time, a team has assembled miniature sensors, circuits and radios suspended in fluids that act as a wearable, flexible electrocardiogram. 

The device, reported on April 4 in the journal Science, is significantly more than a heart-rate monitor users strap on before a jog. It isn’t much thicker than a quarter or bigger than a stamp, yet it opens the door to wirelessly transmitting hospital-quality data after a patient leaves a clinic.

Read More

(via emergentfutures)

Walking West

Artist Conor McGarrigle will walk Denver’s Colfax Avenue, the longest continuous street in America, drawing a 26 mile line to be captured in a satellite photograph.


In his latest psychogeographic performance, which takes place on Friday April 11, McGarrigle will walk the entire 26.2 mile length of Denver’s best known and most controversial street (once dubbed the longest wickedest street in America by Playboy magazine), from the eastern plains through the heart of downtown toward the west.



He will mark his route by drawing a line as he walks with the action captured from space by a commissioned high-resolution satellite photograph.



The very act of walking has become a marginalized practice in many American cities yet by walking we can experience the city itself, at a human pace, as a space of discovery and encounter. The symbolic act of walking Colfax Ave acts as a lens to focus discussion on the role of this street in the cultural, social, economic and political life of Denver and at a wider level the role of urban walking



Please join the artist, either physically or virtually, for part of his walk to discuss the project and help the artist uncover the stories, connections and associations that transform city streets into our neighborhoods. Walking West will begin at 9am at the intersection of East Colfax Avenue and the I-70 and will continue for 8-8.5 hours. Locations will be posted to twitter in real time under the hashtag #walkingwest and estimated timings will be posted to walkingwest.us before the event. 



Follow the artist on Twitter with the hashtag #WalkingWest

Join the artist for the Walking West afterparty at Counterpath Gallery, 613 22nd St Denver, Saturday April 12 7pm.

Walking West

Artist Conor McGarrigle will walk Denver’s Colfax Avenue, the longest continuous street in America, drawing a 26 mile line to be captured in a satellite photograph.

In his latest psychogeographic performance, which takes place on Friday April 11, McGarrigle will walk the entire 26.2 mile length of Denver’s best known and most controversial street (once dubbed the longest wickedest street in America by Playboy magazine), from the eastern plains through the heart of downtown toward the west.

He will mark his route by drawing a line as he walks with the action captured from space by a commissioned high-resolution satellite photograph.

The very act of walking has become a marginalized practice in many American cities yet by walking we can experience the city itself, at a human pace, as a space of discovery and encounter. The symbolic act of walking Colfax Ave acts as a lens to focus discussion on the role of this street in the cultural, social, economic and political life of Denver and at a wider level the role of urban walking

Please join the artist, either physically or virtually, for part of his walk to discuss the project and help the artist uncover the stories, connections and associations that transform city streets into our neighborhoods. Walking West will begin at 9am at the intersection of East Colfax Avenue and the I-70 and will continue for 8-8.5 hours. Locations will be posted to twitter in real time under the hashtag #walkingwest and estimated timings will be posted to walkingwest.us before the event.

Follow the artist on Twitter with the hashtag #WalkingWest

Join the artist for the Walking West afterparty at Counterpath Gallery, 613 22nd St Denver, Saturday April 12 7pm.

theatlantic:

Why The Conversation Should Be Required Viewing at the NSA

Technology—iPhones, Google Glass, tablets, and the like—makes our day-to-day lives easier to quantify than ever. That’s a good thing, in many ways; more information about how people live can help, say, improve healthcare.
But fiction, from George Orwell’s 1984 to this weekend’s box-office hit Captain America: The Winter Soldier, has long warned us about the ways that data collection can also threaten privacy, freedom, and happiness. The most powerful cautionary tale for the Age of Big Data comes from an unlikely place: Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, which turns 40 today.
Read more.

theatlantic:

Why The Conversation Should Be Required Viewing at the NSA

Technology—iPhones, Google Glass, tablets, and the like—makes our day-to-day lives easier to quantify than ever. That’s a good thing, in many ways; more information about how people live can help, say, improve healthcare.

But fiction, from George Orwell’s 1984 to this weekend’s box-office hit Captain America: The Winter Soldier, has long warned us about the ways that data collection can also threaten privacy, freedom, and happiness. The most powerful cautionary tale for the Age of Big Data comes from an unlikely place: Francis Ford Coppola’s The Conversation, which turns 40 today.

Read more.

Call for Abstracts: Relating Systems Thinking and Design 3 (RSD3)

Call for Abstracts: Relating Systems Thinking and Design 3 (RSD3)

The RSD3 Call for Abstracts has been extended until April 16, 2014.
[original deadline was April 01, 2014]

Key Note speakers for the symposium include:
- Hugh Dubberly
- Ranulph Glanville
- Ann Pendleton-Jullian
- John Thackara
- Daniela Sangiorgi


For the Systemic Design Research Network
Alex Ryan, PhD
Senior Systems Design Manager
Government of Alberta


The original call:
After the wonderful event last year we follow up with RSD3.
You are kindly invited to submit your abstract.
Dates October 15th -17th 2014 
Place : Oslo School of Architecture and Design, Oslo, Norway
Call: Abstracts max 1000 words
Deadline: 1st April

Website: www.systemic-design.net

Relating Systems Thinking and Design 3
RSD3 Call for Abstracts

The emerging renaissance of systems thinking in design responds to the  increasing complexity in all challenges faced by designers, strategists,  and transdisciplinary innovators. We are facing deeply entangled  problematics in natural, social, economic, and political systems. Our  professional and organizational worlds have become too complex for linear goal-driven management, and the solution of conventional design thinking is  insufficient to address complexity across domains, scales, and networks.  New thinking, new knowledge, and new forms of intervention are required to  take on this web of interconnected challenges.

The theme for Relating Systems Thinking and Design 3, to be held in Oslo  in October 2014, is: Knowledge of Forms and Forms of Knowledge.  

The Systemic Design Research Network invites systemic designers to think BIG for this year’s symposium. How might systemic design help to:

We are interested in proposals that draw from recent case studies from fieldwork, design inquiry and research, and mixed methods in systems-oriented design. Design practices found effective in fields such as healthcare, governance, environmental stewardship, organizational transformation and social change are of particular interest for cases and discussion within the conference.

We invite you to submit an abstract of no more than 1000 words. Accepted abstracts will be invited to submit a presentation and working paper to the symposium. The process for publication of selected full papers in an international peer reviewed journal will be announced at a later date.

Submissions should be through the submission system April 1, 2014.

For the Systemic Design Research Network
Birger Sevaldson (PhD, MNIL)
Professor at Institute of Design
Oslo School of Architecture and Design
Norway

www.birger-sevaldson.no
www.systemsorienteddesign.net
www.ocean-designresearch.net

"We have left iTunesU in favor of sharing content via YouTube and SoundCloud. We just were not seeing the statistics to continue with iTunesU. We found the administration of the account laborious and the statistical reporting onerous. It was clear to us from an administrative standpoint, it was a drain on staff time that simply wasn’t giving back enough as a distribution channel."

Social Change - BKM TECH (via iamdanw)

(via notational)

"As of today, we have left Flickr (including The Commons). We’ve seen a steady decline in the engagement level at Flickr and it was clear it was time to leave the platform, though we still love it. For those of you who gasped, fear not! We’ve moved all of The Commons material to Wikimedia Commons and images are now being seeded to appropriate articles (take a look at the Paris Expo 1900 to see this beautifully in action). This move will continue to give those assets much-needed visibility while allowing us to focus engagement efforts elsewhere. Additionally, it allows us to continue to focus our efforts at Wikipedia, which is working well and continues as a highly visible platform."

Social Change - BKM TECH (via iamdanw)

(via kenyatta)

shockdingo:

paddyjohnson:

Jonathan Monagham: Rainbow Bison
The boss from Street Fighter, in GIF form by Jonathan Monaghan.

Absolutely magnificent! Jonathan Monaghan, you are a visionary.

shockdingo:

paddyjohnson:

Jonathan Monagham: Rainbow Bison

The boss from Street Fighter, in GIF form by Jonathan Monaghan.

Absolutely magnificent! Jonathan Monaghan, you are a visionary.

(via bitforms)

(Source: yungjake, via arvidabystrom)

ofxRules addon for openFrameworks - Neil Mendoza

ofxRules /o əfɛkts rulz/

1. abbreviation
Polite form of openFrameworksFreakinRulesDooood

2. noun
ofxRules – https://github.com/neilmendoza/ofxRules - is an addon for openFrameworks for generatively creating 3D meshes based on sets of rules (normally contained within XML files). Using this approach it is quick to create complex organic looking 3D objects with a small amount of instructions. Addon features include the ability to live code rules files, easy extensibility of the XML parser with custom actions and the ability to create rules programmatically. It’s inspired by Structure Synth and Philip Rideout’s Mesh Generation with Python.


The addon works by traversing a rules file (or the programatic equivalent of this) to create a tree data structure where each branch has a geometric transform. At each step, for each branch, a rule is chosen and executed. Each rule contains a set of actions that can create geometry and update the transform. Each action can also contain the name of a rule set to pick a rule from next.

"Attempting to fully delineate all of the makerspaces emerging from the many different cultures and practices in Africa would ultimately be somewhat reductive. The tendency to reduce Africa to one entity, culture or socio-economic base is all too familiar. However, there are certain qualities in a more fractal concept of solidarity, which can be seen as a kind of multi-overlapping form of connection rather than a unity. We see many of the same implications in calls for Pan-African solidarity that are seen in the Africa Maker Faire initiative."

Ellan Foster and Ron Eglash at Think Africa Press. Generative Justice in Africa: From Fractals to the Rise of Maker Movements

Contemporary African design trends based on fractals tap into a venerable tradition of self-organisation and open new spaces for local creativity and civic participation.

(via protoslacker)

Call for Abstracts: Art as Open System since the 1960s

Co-chairs: Christine Filippone and Johanna Gosse

SLSA 2014

Introduced into critical art discourse by Jack Burnham in 1968, systems theory was one of the most influential scientific theories for artists working in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Related to the fields of cybernetics, computer technology, automation and systems engineering, the concept of open systemsserved as a model for artists interested in making dynamic, fluid, and interactive art works. By definition, open systems, such as biological, ecological, or social systems, are characterized by a fluid exchange of matter, energy, and information. Open systems are associated with life, growth and change, qualities that took on special political and social resonance for artists seeking to resist the technocratic logic of Cold War America. An exemplary work of systems art, Hans Haacke’s MoMA Poll (1970), consisted of an interactive polling station where visitors were asked to respond “Yes” or “No” by paper ballot to whether Museum of Modern Art trustee and New York gubernatorial candidate Nelson Rockefeller’s support of Nixon’s policies in Vietnam would influence their decision to vote for him. The poll’s outcome was utterly contingent on visitor participation, and prompted a reconsideration of the supposedly “neutral” politics of the museum institution and of modern art in general. This panel asks about the legacy of systems theory for art since the 1960s. How might we use the concept of “open systems” to understand art works that were not explicitly responding to systems theory? What kinds of problems does art-as-open-system pose to the art institution or market? Does it retain its subversive potential? How do contemporary critical paradigms such as “relational aesthetics” or affect theory reflect the inheritance of open systems? This session examines the concept of open systems in relation to a wide range of art practices, including mail art, video art, conceptual art, computer art, Fluxus, intermedia, performance art, expanded cinema, sculpture and installation, feminist art, art and technology, land art, new media, and exhibitions. We welcome presentations by scholars, scientists, artists, and curators working on or at the intersection of art and systems.

Please submit a 1-2 page, double-spaced abstract and CV to cfilippone@millersville.edu and johannagosse@gmail.com by April 25th.

(Source: karaj)

nevver:

Early adopters